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What Can Lead To Inferior Calcaneal Spur

Calcaneal Spur

Overview

A heel spur is a bony projection at the base of the heel bone, as defined by the website webmd.com. Heel spurs are often accompanied by plantar fasciitis, the inflammation of the soft tissues surrounding the spur, and that is what causes the pain in those who suffer from this condition. To cure or remove a heel spur you will need to see a podiatrist; however, there are some natural remedies and exercises that may help.

Causes

A heel spur can develop when there is an abundance of calcium creating a deposit in the calcaneus, or heel bone. Over time, this deposit grows to create an outcropping under the heel that extends into the foot. The result is a protrusion that leads to foot pain when pressure is applied, and in some cases, even during rest.

Heel Spur

Symptoms

If your body has created calcium build-ups in an effort to support your plantar fascia ligament, each time you step down with your foot, the heel spur is being driven into the soft, fatty tissue which lines the bottom of your heel. Heel spur sufferers experience stabbing sensations because the hard protrusion is literally being jabbed into the heel pad. If left untreated, Plantar Fasciitis and heel spurs can erode the fatty pad of the heel and cause permanent damage to the foot. Fortunately, most cases can be resolved without medications or surgeries.

Diagnosis

Your doctor will review your medical history and examine your foot. X-rays are used to identify the location and size of the heel spur.

Non Surgical Treatment

In some cases, heel spur pain may not be resolved through conservative treatment options. In those cases, cortisone injections may be used to reduce inflammation associated with the condition, helping to reduce discomfort. However, treatment options such as these must be discussed in detail with your physician, since more serious forms of treatment could yield negative side effects, such as atrophy of the heel's fat pad, or the rupture of the plantar fascia ligament. Although such side effects are rare, they are potential problems that could deliver added heel pain.

Surgical Treatment

Have surgery if no other treatments work. Before performing surgery, doctors usually give home treatments and improved footwear about a year to work. When nothing else eases the pain, here's what you need to know about surgical options. Instep plantar fasciotomy. Doctors remove part of the plantar fascia to ease pressure on the nerves in your foot. Endoscopy. This surgery performs the same function as an instep plantar fasciotomy but uses smaller incisions so that you'll heal faster. However, endoscopy has a higher rate of nerve damage, so consider this before you opt for this option. Be prepared to wear a below-the-knee walking cast to ease the pain of surgery and to speed the healing process. These casts, or "boots," usually work better than crutches to speed up your recovery time.